award
Nation's Leading Award Winning
Home Design Firm
award

1st Place For Traditional Home Architecture

The TK Design team is proud to share that we were honored with a 1st place award (Traditional Architecture up to 4000 Sq.Ft.) by Detroit Home Magazine at the Detroit Home Design awards event on March 29th!!!!!!

1st – TK Design & Associates Inc.
The master bedroom offers a breathtaking view both day and night, and has an adjacent workout room. The master bath contains an expansive shower with two shower heads on opposite ends, and a rain-head in the center. The kitchen is open to the great room and dining area, which is also wide open to the porch. This house is important because it represents the emergence of a new American architectural style, Dollhouse™, a whimsical play on traditional form, scale, and proportion utilizing purposeful romanticism.

 
26030 Pontiac Trail South Lyon, MI 48178 248-446-1960

Free Video on Lean Design

Making the Case for Framing Sheets

There’s A Document Missing From Your Workflow, And It’s costing you more than you think

Over the past 30 years or so I’ve noticed that some home builders (and architects who design homes) don’t see a value in developing framing sheets for house plan sets.  Instead, the home builder will have the lumber company provide header and beam sizes with their material take-off. The reason for this is simple—cost.  It appears to be a less expensive alternative to having an architect or engineer design the structural system. Unfortunately, this is a flawed approach to cutting cost, or as my dad would say, “penny-wise and pound foolish”  Read More

 

26030 Pontiac Trail South Lyon, MI 48178 248-446-1960

Free Video on Lean Design

2800 Sq.Ft Stunner!!

 

This 2,800-Square-Foot Stunner Makes Them Slam On The Brakes!

26030 Pontiac Trail South Lyon, MI 48178 248-446-1960

Free Video on Lean Design

Infill with a twist

or 248.446.1960.

 
 

Infill With A Twist

 

 

   

 

 

February 03, 2016

The lure of a walkable downtown, public parks, and vibrant city life is driving buyers to seek out urban infill properties. When designed properly, new homes will revitalize a downtown area by aligning today’s architecture with the contextual cues of the existing city fabric. The vast majority of city infill lots are very tight. This forces the home design to be narrow and deep. Often the home will either have a garage dominant façade or a detached two car garage in the rear of the lot. If the garage is detached, the driveway will be on the side of the lot occupying precious real estate and forcing the home to become even narrower. To find property that will accommodate a wider home in this setting is truly a rarity. A wide lot allows for multiple architectural opportunities including effective auto management, stronger street presence, and preferable room arrangements.

The featured home is designed for beautiful downtown Plymouth, Michigan. The design was conceived in a collaborative setting between TK Design and Associates, Bruce Holder Building, and the future owners. The strength of that collaboration is evident in the well thought out design. Let’s take a closer look:

  1. A two-story turret housing a flying staircase anchors the home and creates interest on the street side.
  2. Generous lot width allows the plan to breathe, avoiding stacked boxlike room placement.
  3. A power pantry allows for plenty of storage including an extra freezer.
  4. The porte cochere creates a private entrance to the garage enabling a pedestrian friendly street presence.
  5. The generous laundry area is flooded with light from a large front facing window.
  6. Owner’s tub is eliminated in lieu of an oversized shower.
  7. Bonus space provides an excellent retreat with a balcony overlooking the neighborhood.

The charming Coastal exterior is in perfect harmony with the surrounding homes while the structure’s massing provides a unique character to the urban streetscape. This 3,800 square foot home provides a great twist on traditional infill design with a charm that is unforgettable.

 

 

 

26030 Pontiac Trail South Lyon, MI 48178 248-446-1960

Free Video on Lean Design

Traditional Neighborhood homes

Think “Leave it to Beaver.” Homes designed for traditional neighborhoods should have the following characteristics:

  • Design that encourages a sense of community.
  • Designed to minimize the impact of the automobile.
  • A sense of historical correctness to the massing and fenestration.
  • Historically correct detailing.

To encourage a sense of community, many TND-styled homes will have large porches. This outdoor space (which is typically near the sidewalk) allows homeowners to give a shout out to their neighbors as they pass by. TND neighborhoods encourage pedestrian activity and, as a result, the need for an automobile is diminished. Typically the garage will either be entered from the rear of the home through a carriage lane or minimally set back from the front facade. TND-styled homes also place emphasis on historical architectural correctness relating to the detailing, fenestration, and massing of the home. The Sage is a home designed for a TND community.

 

 

A. Kitchen: Large island with no sink acts as a serving area and has enough seating for five.

B. Kitchen: The kitchen is wide open to the great room and dining area. This is the perfect setup for entertaining guests and casual family living.

C. Den: The study has access to a full bath that allows the space to flex and become a bedroom in the event of a guest visiting the home.

D. Family entrance: Generous space that’s designed for a growing family. Lockers help to keep the space free of clutter.

E. Patio: Integrated outdoor living blends the interior and exterior.

F. Porch: Designed for a corner lot. The massive covered porch creates additional outdoor rooms and a panoramic view.

G. Built-ins: Low built-ins adjacent to the fireplace create a custom look.

H. Bonus: A bonus space adjacent to the owner’s suite is an imaginative space that opens up a lot of interesting possibilities; it can be used as an exercise room, storage room, private study, or home theater space. The opportunities are numerous

26030 Pontiac Trail South Lyon, MI 48178 248-446-1960

Free Video on Lean Design

Transformer Plans — More Than Meets The Eye!

 

This is a transformer-type plan that offers “plug and play” options without too much of a fuss for the builder. A very popular option as of late is the multigenerational offering.  Having the ability to take a space and convert it to appeal to a family with an aging parent is priceless. This design allows for that type of conversion. It also provides an opportunity to convert the second-floor bonus room into an apartment, office, or fitness area—separate and private from the rest of the house. Let’s take a closer look:

26030 Pontiac Trail South Lyon, MI 48178 248-446-1960

Free Video on Lean Design

Decorative ceilings — That’s what’s up

 

Photo courtesy of houzz.com.

 

As I travel the country working with builders I am always on the lookout for emerging trends. There is a hot one cooking right now—decorative ceilings.

This trend is borne from another—the open floor plan. Consumers love the open floor plan concept. One room flows into another. The kitchen and dining space meld with living areas. Living in an open floor plan (for most buyers) is functionally ideal. There is a problem with the open plan concept, however…

 

Read More

26030 Pontiac Trail South Lyon, MI 48178 248-446-1960

Free Video on Lean Design

Taking a Value Design from Bland to Beautiful

 

Taking a Value Design from Bland to Beautiful

In today’s market, creating a house that has built-in value is key to sustainability for both homeowner and builder. In an attempt to reduce costs many builders are opting for the “value box” approach. The value box concept is to completely stack the second floor over the first floor walls. This includes the walls in the garage as well. By stacking the walls the builder is able to completely take full advantage of the foundation and create simplicity in the structure. This approach most often results in a two story garage as the prominent element. This can make the façade foreboding and unappealing to potential homeowners. There are ways to handle this however, below is an example of beautifying the façade without breaking the bank. Let’s take a closer look at the before elevation below:

At first glance you might notice the separation of the windows. The generous space between the windows with sparse detailing above the gaping garage door oddly evokes an image of a face (a classic look for scary cartoon houses.) The garage massing dominates the home and throws the whole composition off balance. It is reminiscent of grandpa’s old adage: “the tail wagging the dog.” While this arrangement creates an economical solution by stacking structural elements, the mass becomes overwhelming and therefore unappealing.

How do we dress up what is otherwise a very nice home design? One way is by shifting focus and drawing your eye across the façade. In this example we extend roof elements over the porch to soften the effect of the large garage mass. Also, projecting the porch with a defining roof helps to create variations in the front of the structure and brings the size of the mass down to a more human scale.

Grouping the windows together above the garage door eliminates the scary face look and adds the charm and grace of a cottage home. Trim details are also added to further reduce the field of siding, adding texture and visual appeal. Detailing over the garage provides a break in the vertical nature of the garage massing.

Why is this important? The answer: First impressions. Builders competing in today’s market have found that bad proportions, oversized windows and lack of detailing make selling homes difficult even though the floor plan may work for the buyer. That first impression becomes crucial in pulling the buyer into the house so they can see that this is truly the home for them. If the buyer does not feel an instant emotional connection with the home it is much more difficult to make a sale. Creating a warm,aesthetically pleasing exterior is one of the best ways to tug at the heart strings of potential buyers.

I had the pleasure of meeting Mary Schumacher from Schumacher Homes a few years back and besides the fact that she is witty and charming, she is also brimming with wisdom. She told me that she always wanted designs that would make the prospects “slam on the brakes.” She explained that a house should look so great from the curb that it causes people to immediately put the brakes on. That really resonated with me, and now with every house I design I give it the Mary test: Will this house really cause them to slam on the brakes? The over-riding goal should be to build a value designed home that is guilty of creating a few fender benders without crashing the budget.

While there are many ways to design value into your home one of the strongest methods in the industry is to utilize Lean Design. Lean Design uses the art of collaboration between architect, builder, construction and sales to create a home that exceeds the buyer expectations and builds efficiently allowing for larger margins. Lean Design ensures elimination of waste while utilizing today’s hottest home building trends. It is a fallacy to think that in order for a home to build efficiently that it must be cheap. The opposite is true! By eliminating waste Lean Design allows budget for amenities that would otherwise be off the table. When designing a value home there is no need to be drab or bland. Instead warm the exterior with trim, proper proportions and design aesthetic. This will bring the type of balance and proportion to your designs that will cause potential buyers to slam on their brakes!

By Todd Hallett President of TK Design & Associates, Inc. He may be reached at [email protected]

 

26030 Pontiac Trail South Lyon, MI 48178 248-446-1960

Free Video on Lean Design

Todd’s Blog on HousingZone

 Check out Todd’s latest blog on http://www.housingzone.com/author/todd-hallett

26030 Pontiac Trail South Lyon, MI 48178 248-446-1960

Free Video on Lean Design